A reference to its famous monument, “Great Faces. Great Places” appears on the license plate of which U.S. sta te?

A reference to its famous monument, “Great Faces. Great Places” appears on the license plate of which U.S. state?

Friday, September 8, 2017

5:26 PM

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· Montana

· North Dakota

· Wyoming

· South Dakota

Answer: South Dakota is known as the land of "Great Faces. Great Places." It refers to the famous faces of the four American presidents on Mount Rushmore National Memorial. The state slogan was adopted in 1990 and can be seen on license places, promotional materials and some road signs. Sculpted by Gutzon Borglum and later by his son Lincoln Borglum, Mount Rushmore features 60-foot sculptures of the heads of former United States presidents (in order from left to right) George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln.

South Dakota – answer

‘This storm has the potential to catastrophically devastate our state’ – The Washington Post

‘This storm has the potential to catastrophically devastate our state’ – The Washington Post

Friday, September 8, 2017

3:31 PM

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You’ll receive free e-mail news updates each time a new story is published. Miami Beach residents brace for Hurricane Irma as the powerful category 5 storm barrels towards southern Florida. (Zoeann Murphy, Dalton Bennett/The Washington Post)

Miami Beach residents brace for Hurricane Irma as the powerful category 5 storm barrels towards southern Florida. (Zoeann Murphy,Dalton Bennett/The Washington Post)

MIAMI — Florida officials urged residents in flood-prone coastal communities to get out while they can, ordering evacuations in the face of oncoming Hurricane Irma, which could make landfall Sunday and inflict massive destruction not seen in the state since Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

Hurricanes have lashed South Florida many times, but officials here at the National Hurricane Center said this is shaping up as a once-in-a-generation storm. Forecasters adjusted their advisory late Thursday, projecting Irma to hit the tip of the peninsula, slamming the population centers of South Florida before grinding northward. Hurricane warnings were issued Thursday night for South Florida, with the hurricane center warning that “severe hurricane conditions are expected over portions of the Florida peninsula and the Florida Keys beginning late Saturday.”

“This storm has the potential to catastrophically devastate our state,” Gov. Rick Scott (R) said in a late-day news briefing. Earlier, he implored people to evacuate. “If you live in any evacuation zones and you’re still at home, leave.”

[Category 5 Irma stays on perilous path toward Florida]

The state’s highways were jammed, gas was scarce, airports were packed and mandatory evacuations began to roll out as the first official hurricane watches were issued for the region. Irma, which has been ravaging the Caribbean islands as it sweeps across the Atlantic, is expected to hit the Florida peninsula with massive storm surges and crippling winds that could affect nearly every metropolitan area in South Florida.

The hurricane center said Thursday afternoon that should Irma’s eye move through the center of the state, extreme winds and heavy rains could strafe an area that has millions of residents, from Miami in the east to Naples on the Gulf Coast. Because the eastern side of the storm is the most powerful, numerous cities along the east coast could face extreme conditions.

Miami-Dade County ordered some mandatory evacuations, including for Key Biscayne and Miami Beach, as well as for areas in the southern half of the county that are not protected by barrier islands.

“EVACUATE Miami Beach!” Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine tweeted, later noting in a news release that once winds top 40 mph, first responders will no longer be dispatched on rescue missions here.

Broward County Mayor Barbara Sharief said evacuations in coastal areas were slated for Thursday. Lee County, on the Gulf Coast, announced Thursday afternoon that all the barrier islands — Sanibel, Captiva, Pine Island, Bonita Beach and Fort Myers Beach — will be under mandatory evacuation orders Friday.

Scott on Thursday night ordered that all state offices, public schools, state colleges and state universities be shut down from Friday through Monday “to ensure we have every space available for sheltering and staging.”

Scott has declared a statewide emergency and warned that in addition to potentially forcing large-scale evacuations, Irma could batter areas that last year were flooded by Hurricane Matthew. States of emergency also were declared in Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina. On Thursday, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal (R) expanded his declaration from six coastal counties to 30 total counties, issuing a mandatory evacuation for some areas.

Residents in Savannah, Ga., and Charleston, S.C., began to barricade their homes and flee the coast Thursday. Gov. Henry McMaster (R) warned South Carolinians that a mandatory evacuation of the state’s coastline will probably come Saturday morning at 10 a.m. Such an evacuation would come with a reversal of all eastbound lanes of four major roadways, including Interstate 26, which would be converted for a westbound escape from Charleston to Columbia.

Irma on Thursday remained a Category 5 storm, with 175 mph sustained maximum winds, and it is a big storm, with hurricane-force winds extending 60 miles from its center. If the eye does not make landfall, many of the people who haven’t evacuated from South Florida could find themselves in hurricane conditions anyway, forecasters say.

A line of vehicles waits to dump trimmed trees and other refuse in a West Miami-Dade County disposal area near Miami on Thursday. Weak tree limbs, patio furniture and other large objects likely to be driven by the wind are being removed as Hurricane Irma is predicted to arrive Sunday. (Andrew Innerarity/For The Washington Post)

Residents are closely watching “the spaghetti” — the dozens of computer models showing possible storm tracks, which vary widely. Computer models say that by Sunday, Irma will make a hard right turn, heading due north into Florida.

The timing of that turn will make all the difference.

If sooner, the storm’s center could stay offshore, between Miami and the Bahamas. If later, it could blow through the Florida Keys and come up the southwest side of Florida. Or it could find a middle path straight up through the Everglades and the central spine of the peninsula.

“The wild card here is the turn. Anytime a hurricane makes a turn, it introduces uncertainty,” Mark DeMaria, acting deputy director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami, told The Washington Post in the center’s headquarters in west Miami-Dade County. DeMaria noted that the computer models have fluctuated modestly, with adjustments in the consensus track of 50 miles or so every day. “But 50 miles onshore versus right of the coast makes a huge difference in impact,” he said.

The combination of Florida’s geography, the pattern of urban settlement in narrow bands along the coasts and the projected northerly path of the hurricane presents a particularly ominous picture.

“This is a large storm coming from the south,” said Dennis Feltgen, spokesman for the hurricane center. “That’s the worst-case scenario, because it takes in the entire Gold Coast population, and you have the greatest impact from storm surge from that direction.”

Irma’s sustained winds were the strongest recorded for an Atlantic hurricane making landfall, tied with the 1935 Florida Keys hurricane.

“Look at the size of this storm,” Scott said. “It’s powerful and deadly.”

Many Floridians were heeding warnings to escape but found themselves sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic in an effort to reach points north.

A little after 10 a.m. at the National Hotel on Miami Beach, a manager announced in four languages — English, Spanish, Portuguese and French — that guests needed to evacuate because of a city order. At the front desk, guests were given a sheet listing the locations of emergency shelters, none of which were likely to be as nice as the beachfront Art Deco hotel, which was restored a few years ago.

“This morning as I walked to work, I could see the things that could become projectiles,” said Natalya Garus, 35, lead concierge at the National. “Street signs. Coconuts. All the trash cans. Smoking stations. All the decorations.”

As she spoke, workers used a ladder to dismantle a decorative light fixture hanging over the hotel entrance.

Ruben Vandebosch, 28, and Wim Marten, 26, both of Belgium, and Jim Van Es, 24, of the Netherlands, said their plan is to drive to Atlanta.

“Atlanta has a nice ring to it,” Vandebosch said. “It sounds cool.”

Among those evacuating: Forty dogs from the Miami-Dade County animal shelter. They’re being flown to New York on a private plane owned by a dog lover named Georgina Bloomberg, according to Lauree Simmons, president and founder of the Big Dog Rescue shelter in Loxahatchee, Fla.

Big Dog staff went to Houston after Hurricane Harvey, rescuing 60 dogs from the floodwaters. Those dogs are awaiting adoption at the no-kill shelter. Simmons’s 33-acre rescue center has 457 dogs and puppies living in air-conditioned bunkhouses. Staff members were working frenetically Thursday packing up the contents of offices trailers. The dog bunkhouses, meanwhile, are fitted with hurricane impact glass built to withstand 200-mile-an-hour winds, Simmons said.

“The dogs will be very comfortable,” she said. “We’ll stay here with them through the storm and just keep hoping for the best.”

Lauren Jackowiec, adoptions manager for the Jacksonville, Fla., Humane Society, loads crates of cats into the Humane Society’s van for an evacuation trip to Sarasota, Fla., on Thursday. (Bob Self/Florida Times Union via AP)

Popular shopping and dining areas of Fort Lauderdale, north of Miami, were nearly completely empty, the businesses buttoned up with metal curtains and new plywood protecting their front windows.

At the Coral Ridge Yacht Club on the Intracoastal Waterway, General Manager Jay Wallace and Greg Bennett, the club’s president, were walking up and down its docks making sure all the vessels, including some 90- and 100-footers valued at $2 million or more, were securely tied down. The club decided Tuesday to cease regular operations — meetings, lunch, dinner and a popular Wednesday happy hour — so that many employees would have time to evacuate.

“Just making sure everything is okay,” Wallace said. “We’re hoping for the best, but preparing for the worst. You have to.”

Less than a mile away, Fort Lauderdale’s mostly spotless sandy beaches were virtually deserted, despite the green flags attached to all its lifeguard stands indicating “low hazard” for anyone wanting to take a dip in the ocean. The water was dead calm, not a wave in sight, and the shimmering sand was desolate on a postcard 90-degree day.

In Orlando, four Stetson University students prepared to fly out of town on cheap tickets bought Monday, before prices skyrocketed and seats vanished. One of the students, Draven Shean, is a freshman who has been at school for three weeks and is heading home to Houston, where his family had evacuated in advance of Hurricane Harvey.

“I keep making this joke that God keeps sending hurricanes after me,” said Shean, who was wearing a long-sleeved gray shirt with black block letters that said “EVAC.” He picked it up two days ago at a thrift store. “I thought it was appropriate.”

Others were preparing to ride out the storm. Some were fully prepared, others seemed to have only a vague plan, or none at all.

Shelves that once held bottled water are empty as the city prepares for approaching Hurricane Irma. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

At a Costco in Naples, in southwest Florida, almost every morning shopper left the store with a flat or two of bottled water. At Costco’s gas station, vehicles jammed the six lanes for fuel. Several customers said the 24 cars waiting at 11 a.m. were nothing compared with the lines during the past two days. Some customers were on their third or fourth gas station seeking to fill up.

“As soon as they said you should consider evacuating, things got way worse,” said Michelle Anderson, who was waiting for gas in her Volvo. “I’m from Southern California, where earthquakes get you at random, so the fact that you have the ability to prepare for this is pretty awesome.”

Vicki Sargent, a Florida resident since 2003, lives in an RV park in Venice and had driven miles in search of gas Thursday. She said she has to ride out the storm because she takes care of about 70 units owned by people gone for the summer. She won’t stay in her own trailer, though.

“Only a fool would do that,” she said, saying she’ll stay with a friend. “I’m more worried about flooding than the hurricane. We have had rain and were about at saturation point.”

Tatiana Wood, 33, a waitress at a restaurant in Miami Beach’s Lincoln Road Mall, said she has a friend of a friend who lives in Oklahoma, but she was unclear of the distance or whether she would try to get there.

“If you try to escape, you may lose money,” Wood said. “If you stay, you might lose your life.”

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The National Hurricane Center’s acting director, Ed Rappaport, is seen during a televised interview at the National Weather Service’s facility in Miami, where they track and predict Hurricane Irma’s advance. (Andrew Innerarity/For The Washington Post)

Read more: The latest forecast from Capital Weather Gang

It’s not a Category 6: Debunking viral myths about Irma

Dispatch from Key West: Preparing for Irma’s wrath

Sullivan reported from Naples, Fla., and Berman reported from Washington. Kimberly Kindy in Orlando, Lori Rozsa in Palm Beach County, Dustin Waters in Charleston, S.C., and Leonard Shapiro and Perry Stein in Fort Lauderdale contributed to this report.

NCI’s Douglas R. Lowy and John T. Schiller to receive 2017 Lasker Award | National Institutes of Health (NIH)

NCI’s Douglas R. Lowy and John T. Schiller to receive 2017 Lasker Award | National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Friday, September 8, 2017

3:20 PM

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News Release

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Credit: Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation

Two scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) will receive the 2017 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their significant research leading to the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. The award is the country’s most prestigious biomedical research prize, and will be presented to John T. Schiller, Ph.D., of NCI’s Center for Cancer Research (CCR), and Douglas R. Lowy, M.D., also in CCR and acting director of NCI. NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Lowy’s and Dr. Schiller’s collaborative work to understand and prevent HPV infection has led to the approval of three preventive HPV vaccines by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“I’m incredibly proud of this much-deserved honor bestowed upon John and Doug for their foundational discoveries that led to the creation of HPV vaccines,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. “Thanks to their extraordinary efforts, we have the potential to eliminate cervical cancer and greatly reduce other HPV-associated cancers. This award reinforces the critical importance of basic research in the development of medical breakthroughs like the HPV vaccine.”

Efforts to develop these vaccines were spurred by an urgent public health need. Infection with certain types of HPV causes almost all cases of cervical cancer, the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide. More than 500,000 women around the world are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year, many of them at relatively young ages. More than 275,000 women die from the disease annually, and most of these deaths occur in developing regions of the world. Without successful interventions, the worldwide incidence and mortality from cervical cancer is projected to increase indefinitely. HPV infection also causes anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers.

While working to address the need to prevent HPV-caused cancers in the 1990s, a team led by Drs. Schiller and Lowy discovered that the proteins that form the outer shell of HPV could form virus-like particles (VLPs) that closely resemble the original virus but are not infectious. They found that these VLPs could trigger the immune system to produce high levels of protective antibodies that can neutralize the virus in a subsequent infection. The VLPs ultimately became the basis of the three current HPV vaccines: Gardasil, Gardasil 9, and Cervarix.

Drs. Lowy and Schiller say this breakthrough was possible because of earlier discoveries, and that it demonstrates the importance of long-term, publicly supported basic research.

“People have known since the 19th century that cervical cancer behaved as a sexually transmitted disease, but it wasn’t until the discoveries of Harald zur Hausen and his colleagues that HPV was found to be the cause. Development of the vaccines built upon decades of publicly supported research,” said Dr. Lowy. “We’re honored to be included with the other luminaries who have received this prestigious award.”

It is estimated that widespread uptake of current HPV vaccines could reduce the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer by more than two-thirds. Researchers are currently working to find ways to encourage uptake of the vaccines by lowering costs and simplifying the logistics of vaccination, especially in the developing world where most cervical cancers occur.

“This year’s Lasker Medical Research Awards illustrate the power of biomedical investigation to advance human health, whether scientists probe basic questions that reveal unforeseen truths or pursue goal-directed projects,” said Joseph L. Goldstein, M.D., chairman of the Department of Molecular Genetics at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and chair of the Lasker Medical Research Awards Jury. “Douglas Lowy and John Schiller discovered that a single protein from the capsule of papillomaviruses can self-assemble into virus-like particles, paving the way for HPV vaccines that prevent cervical and other cancers.”

Drs. Schiller and Lowy have co-authored more than 150 papers over the last 30 years, and have been recognized frequently for their work. They received the Federal Employee of the Year Service to America Medal from the Partnership for Public Service in 2007, and the Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award from the Sabin Vaccine Institute in 2011. In November 2014, President Barack Obama presented them with the 2012 National Medal of Technology and Innovation.

Both researchers have noted how important it has been to their work to be part of the NCI intramural program, where scientists can do long-term, high-risk research that has the potential to have a major impact on human health. The program also encourages collaboration with specialists in many different scientific areas.

“When we started this research, we didn’t have a background in immunology or vaccinology, or clinical trials, so we greatly benefited from having access to scientific specialists who freely shared their expertise in these areas,” Dr. Schiller said. “These advances would not have happened without the many outstanding people we have worked with throughout the years.”

Since 1945, the Lasker Awards have recognized outstanding contributions to basic and clinical medical research and public service. Eighty-seven Lasker Award recipients have won the Nobel Prize, and more than 40 have done so in the last three decades. This year’s awards will be presented on September 15 in New York City.

About the National Cancer Institute (NCI): NCI leads the National Cancer Program and NIH’s efforts to dramatically reduce the prevalence of cancer and improve the lives of cancer patients and their families, through research into prevention and cancer biology, the development of new interventions, and the training and mentoring of new researchers. For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI website at cancer.gov or call NCI’s Contact Center (formerly known as the Cancer Information Service) at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237).

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

NIH…Turning Discovery Into Health®

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Pierre Bergé, long-time business partner and companion of Yves Saint Laurent, dies at 86 – France 24

Pierre Bergé, long-time business partner and companion of Yves Saint Laurent, dies tat 86 – France 24

Friday, September 8, 2017

2:45 PM

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© Stéphane de Sakutin AFP | French businessman Pierre Berge pictured on February 11, 2015, at his office in Paris.

Pierre Bergé, the long-time companion and business partner of legendary French designer Yves Saint Laurent, died Friday at the age of 86.

In a joint statement to AFP, two foundations that Bergé founded with Saint Laurent announced that he had died at his home following a "long illness".

"The Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent Foundation in Paris and the Jardin Majorelle Foundation in Marrakech announce with great sadness the death of their president and founder Pierre Bergé on Friday, September 8 at 5:39am at his home in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence", the statement said.

A passionate bibliophile and art collector, he was also a tireless campaigner for gay rights and donated a large part of his fortune to AIDS research.

Politically engaged to the end, Bergé was an important backer and confidant of former president François Mitterrand, and this year he threw his support behind Emmanuel Macron’s successful campaign for the Élysée Palace.

A ‘prince’ of the arts and noble causes

France’s former culture minister Jack Lang led the early tributes to a man he called a "true prince of the arts and culture".

"He was a magician who made his life, and those [of] whom he loved, a symphony of happiness," he said.

"Pierre Bergé was, above all, a marvellous and loyal friend … who was there to take on all the good fights, the noble causes, in particular to provide the means for research to defeat AIDS."

Bergé and Saint Laurent were joined in a civil union a few days before the designer died of a brain tumour in 2008 at age 71.

© Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent

Two museums dedicated to the career of Saint Laurent are slated to open in October, one at his long-time former studio at 5 avenue Marceau in Paris and the other in Marrakech, one of his favourite cities. Laurent and Bergé first visited the Moroccan city in the mid-1960s and quickly bought a house there.

“Yves Saint Laurent and I discovered Marrakech in 1966, and we never left,” Bergé told Bloomberg earlier this year. “This city deeply influenced Saint Laurent’s life and work, particularly his discovery of colour.”

The Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris will open on October 3 and will coincide with the inauguration of the Musée Yves Saint Laurent Marrakech near the Jardin Majorelle.

© Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent

(FRANCE 24 with AFP)

Date created : 2017-09-08

Clipped from: http://www.france24.com/en/20170908-pierre-berge-former-business-partner-companion-yves-saint-laurent-dies-86?ref=tw_i

is jamaica in the path of hurricane irma

is jamaica in the path of hurricane irma

Friday, September 8, 2017

12:11 AM

Barbuda declared uninhabitable following Hurricane Irma | Loop News

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While Antigua escaped major damage from Hurricane Irma, its sister island, Barbuda, was not so fortunate.

The island sustained widespread devastation with 95 percent of the houses destroyed or damaged.

Some houses were totally demolished, some lost roofs, the island is under water and utilities have been damaged.

Prime Minister Gaston Browne toured the island in the aftermath of the Category 5 hurricane and saw first-hand the damage which the island experienced.

There was one fatality on the island, a young child, he revealed.

Speaking in a Facebook Live interview with ABS TV, Browne said evacuation, for now, will be voluntary and will become mandatory if Tropical Storm Jose poses a threat to the islands.

He said after assessing the damage, the 1800 people on the island could be accommodated either by relatives in Antigua, for those who could do so or the Government would have to rent private buildings. Sixty percent of the residents on the island are homeless, he revealed.

Browne said the island is practically uninhabitable as there is no water, electricity or telecommunications.

Browne, who earlier praised Antigua’s preparations for the minimal damage, said he felt to cry when he saw the destruction in Barbuda. He said when he saw how much Antigua was spared he never thought there would be such a contrast.

“It was heart-wrenching,” he said.

Browne said within the next 18 hours, forces will be mobilised to give relief to the residents of the island.

He said it will cost over US150 million to rebuild the island, a process that will take years.

Earlier today, ABS TV said all communication was lost with Barbuda when the Hurricane hit just after midnight.

Browne’s tour of the island showed one cell tower broken in two. he said a backup ham radio, as well as a satellite radio, were destroyed during the hurricane.

A person suffering from leporiphobia would fear which cartoon character?

Question: A person suffering from leporiphobia would fear which cartoon character?

Thursday, September 7, 2017

5:27 PM

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Answer: Leporiphobia, is an abnormal, debilitating, and often paralyzing fear of bunny rabbits. It is among the most common phobias in the Western hemisphere. People with leporiphobia will, by any means necessary, stay away from any area they believe to be inhabited bunnies. If they see a bunny they will refuse to enter the general vicinity until they overcome the severe panic attack that is always associated with it. Leporiphobia begins at a young age for most, and usually lasts until death. Tennis star Andy Roddick is rumored to have a fear of bunnies.

Destiny 2 Is Crashing Repeatedly for Some Unlucky PS4 Pro Users

Destiny 2 Is Crashing Repeatedly for Some Unlucky PS4 Pro Users

Thursday, September 7, 2017

4:54 PM

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Destiny 2’s launch hasn’t been totally void of problems.

Destiny 2’s launch hasn’t gone smoothly for some unlucky players. Individuals running the game on PS4 Pro have reported repeated crashing and freezing, in some cases, blocking their progress entirely.

PS4 Pro players have joined a thread on the Bungie forums complaining of crashes when playing on PS4 Pro. Bungie immediately responded to the thread, reassuring with the following statement:

“Hello all,

Thank you for your reports! We are aware of reports of some PS4 Pro players encountering crashes and are working with our partners to investigate the issue.”

Crashes have been reported across several different missions and, in the worst instances, with a frequency of every 3-4 minutes. Several players have stated a particular issue when introduced to Zavala in the opening tutorial mission. The error code that pops up is “Error Code CE-34878-0”.

Interestingly, some players mention that this was a crash code that was reported during the Destiny 2 beta.

As of yet, there is no official fix for the crash/error code. Several players have listed different attempts at fixing the issue without success. We have put together a compilation of potential fixes.

Bungie forum user TilmenDASH has made a video log of the crashes experienced while playing on the PS4 Pro. You can check it out below:

MORE NEWS

Judge Andrew Napolitano: DACA and the rule of law | Fox News

Judge Andrew Napolitano: DACA and the rule of law | Fox News

Thursday, September 7, 2017

10:49 AM

Earlier this week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that in six months, the Department of Justice will begin the long process for deportation proceedings against 800,000 young people who came to America as babies and young children in the care of their parents and others because those entries into this country were and remain unlawful.

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When President Obama signed numerous executive orders attempting to set forth the conditions under which illegally immigrated adults whose children were born here could lawfully remain here, he was challenged in federal court and he lost.

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Sessions believes that the government would lose again if it declined to deport those who came here illegally as babies and young children.

Here is the back story.

Shortly after President Obama formalized two programs, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (commonly known as DACA) and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (commonly, DAPA), in a series of executive orders, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit ruled that DAPA — the orders protecting undocumented immigrants who are the parents of children born here — was unconstitutional.

Before signing his executive orders, Obama tried to persuade Congress to amend federal immigration laws so as to permit those who came here illegally and bore children here and those who came here illegally as infants to remain here with work permits, high school diplomas, Social Security numbers, jobs and other indicia of stability and permanence. After Congress declined to vote on the Obama proposals, he authored his now-famous DACA and DAPA executive orders. He basically decided to do on his own what Congress had declined to do legislatively.

But Obama’s executive orders were not novel; they merely formalized what every president since Ronald Reagan — including President Donald Trump — has effectively done. Each has declined to deport undocumented immigrants who bore children here or who were brought here as young children. President Obama alone showed the courage to put this in writing, thereby giving immigrants notice of what they need to do to avoid deportation and the government notice of whose deportations should not occur.

Numerous states challenged Obama’s DAPA orders in federal court. The states argued that because they are required to provide a social safety net — hospital emergency rooms, public schools, financial assistance for the poor, etc. — for everyone within their borders, whether there lawfully or unlawfully, DAPA was increasing their financial burden beyond their ability or will to pay. Stated differently, they argued that the president alone was effectively compelling these states to spend state tax dollars against the will of elected state officials. The states also argued that DAPA was such a substantial deviation from the immigration statutes that Congress had written that it amounted to the president’s rewriting the law and thereby usurping the constitutional powers of Congress.

A federal district judge agreed with the states, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit affirmed that ruling. That court held that by increasing the financial burden on states against the will of the elected officials of the states, the president had violated the Guarantee Clause of the Constitution — which guarantees a representative form of government in the states, not one in which a federal official can tell state officials how to spend state tax dollars.

It also ruled that by enforcing his executive orders instead of the laws as Congress wrote them — those laws mandate deportation for all who came here illegally, no matter their age or family status — the president was failing to take care that all federal laws be enforced. That behavior, the court ruled, violated the Take Care Clause of the Constitution, which compels the president to enforce federal laws as they were written, not as he might wish them to be.

The Supreme Court declined to intervene by a 4-4 vote, thereby permitting the 5th Circuit decision to stand undisturbed.

When Sessions announced this week that DACA will not be followed after March 5, 2018, he said he is confident that DACA is unconstitutional for the same reasons that the courts found DAPA to be unconstitutional. Yet there are moral, constitutional, legal and economic arguments on this that will be an obstacle to the cancellation of this long-standing program.

Morally, most of the beneficiaries of DACA are fully Americanized young adults who know no other life but what they have here and have no roots in the countries of their births. Many are serving the U.S. in the military.

Constitutionally, DACA has effectively been in place since 1986, and 800,000 people younger than 40 have planned their lives in reliance upon it. Legally, once a benefit has been given by the government and relied upon, the courts are reluctant to rescind it, even though the 5th Circuit showed no such reluctance.

Economically, the summary removal of more than three-quarters of a million people from the workforce would have serious negative consequences for their employers and dependents and for delicate economic forces, and there would be negative economic consequences to the government, as well, as each claimed hardship case — each person whose deportation is ordered — is entitled to a hearing at the government’s expense.

Now many Republican and Democratic lawmakers in Congress want to make a close version of Obama’s executive orders with respect to immigrant infants (DACA) the law of the land — something they declined to do when Obama was president. Were this to happen, the tables would be turned on Trump. He would be confronted with the constitutional duty of enforcing a federal law that he has condemned.

Andrew P. Napolitano, a former judge of the Superior Court of New Jersey, is the senior judicial analyst at Fox News Channel.

breaks another record, becoming first Atlantic hurricane to maintain 185mph winds for 24 hours | The Independent

breaks another record, becoming first Atlantic hurricane to maintain 185mph winds for 24 hours | The Independent

Hurricane Irma has set another record, having sustained max wind speeds of 185 miles per hour for more than 24 hours – so becoming the only Atlantic hurricane to sustain that powerful wind speed for so long.

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The last hurricane is maintain such winds for even close to that long was hurricane Allen, which hit northern Mexico and southern Texas in 1980. Allen had winds of 180 mph and above for around 18 hours. The top wind speed for Allen was 190 mph.

Irma has clobbered Caribbean islands with pounding winds, rain and surging surf on Wednesday as officials in Florida called for evacuations ahead of the storm’s expected landfall there this weekend.

Irma could become the second powerful storm to thrash the US mainland in as many weeks, but its precise trajectory remained uncertain. Hurricane Harvey killed about 60 people and caused as much as $180 billion in damage after hitting Texas late last month.

Latest updates on hurricane Irma in our live blog

The eye of Irma was passing over the northernmost Virgin Islands on Wednesday afternoon after crossing the half-French, half-Dutch island of St. Martin, the US National Hurricane Center said. Category 5 is its highest category.

On its current path the core of Irma, which the Miami-based centre said was the strongest Atlantic storm on record, was expected to pass near or just north of Puerto Rico on Wednesday before scraping the north coast of the Dominican Republic on Thursday.

Karel van Oosterom, the Netherlands ambassador to the United Nations, said Irma had hit the Dutch islands of Saba and Sint Eustasius before overrunning St. Martin.

“First information indicates that a lot of damage has been done, but communication is still extremely difficult,” he said at a UN meeting.

Hurricane Irma – in pictures

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Hurricane Irma – in pictures

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A tree collapsed on a house in St Martin

· 2/18

A hotel in Saint Martin is gutted by floodwater during the hurricane

Guadeloupe 1ère

· 3/18

Cars submerged in Saint Martin

Rinsy Xieng

· 4/18

Debris floats amongst the floodwater in Saint Martin

@la1ere

· 5/18

Household items float down the street in Gustavia, Saint-Barthélemy

Carole Greaux

· 6/18

The coast of St Martin is flooded as the hurricane hits the island

Météo Express

· 7/18

A whole street underwater in Saint Martin

@la1ere

· 8/18

A car crashes into the tree amongst the chaos in Saint Martin

@Bondtehond

· 9/18

A building on the St Martin seafront, destroyed by the hurricane

@Bondtehond

· 10/18

@Bondtehond

· 11/18

Palm trees bend in the wind in San Juan, Puerto Rico as Hurricane Irma slammed across islands in the northern Caribbean

Reuters/Alvin Baez

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A woman runs in the rain as Hurricane Irma slammed into San Juan, Puerto Rico

Reuters/Alvin Baez

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A picture taken on September 5, 2017 shows a view of the Baie Nettle beach in Marigot, with the wind blowing ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Irma

AFP/Getty Images

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A man rides past a boarded up house as part of preparations ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Irma on September 5, 2017, in the French overseas island of Guadeloupe

Helene Valenzuela/AFP

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Employees of the Mercure Hotel fill sand bags on the Baie Nettle beach in Marigot, as part of the preparations for the arrival of Hurricane Irma

Lionel Chamoiseau/AFP

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People in line at Costco, as they find out the store has ran out of water on September 5, 2017 in North Miami

Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP

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Night view of the city of Cap-Haitien, in the north of Haiti, 240 km from Port-au-Prince, on September 5, 2017

Hector Retamal/AFP

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Bonjour Food Market in Miami prepares for Hurricane Irma

Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP

Irma began lashing Puerto Rico with rain at mid-morning. Governor Ricardo Rossello told residents to stay inside as the storm bore down on the island. “There is no reason to be in the street,” Mr Rossello told a midday press conference.

Many businesses in the capital San Juan were closed and many buildings were covered with storm shutters. Occasional shoppers were out making final purchases of water, ice and food to prepare for what could be several days without power.

Rene Franco, a 37-year-old medical student, said he had still not decided whether to flee to a shelter.

“I feel ready. I bought groceries. I bought water — too much water,” he said as he walked his 12-year-old dog Heaven before the storm arrived. “In the past I have always stayed in my house but this time it depends. It depends on the waves and the water. This is a very difficult storm.”

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Related video: Dramatic footage as NOAA plane flies into Irma

After Irma battered the island nation of Antigua and Barbuda, emergency officials reported three injuries and minimal damage, with some roofs blown off. Prime Minister Gaston Browne said flights would resume from the airport Wednesday afternoon.

Many of the Caribbean’s Leeward Islands were under a hurricane watch, including the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeastern Bahamas, the NHC said.

In Paris, the French government said it had delivered water and food to two overseas territories, St. Martin and St. Barthelemy, and that emergency response teams would be sent once the storm had passed.

Power was knocked out on both islands, according to prefecture officials on Guadeloupe. At least four buildings were damaged and low-lying regions had been flooded, French Interior Minister Gerard Collomb said.

The UN World Food Programme prepared to provide emergency aid to Haiti if it was hit by Irma. The country was ravaged by a 2010 earthquake and Hurricane Matthew last year.

US President Donald Trump said he and aides were monitoring Irma’s progress. “But it looks like it could be something that will be not good. Believe me, not good,” he told reporters at the White House.

Mr Trump, whose Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida, could take a direct hit from the storm, has already approved emergency declarations for Florida, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands, mobilising federal disaster relief efforts.

Florida Governor Rick Scott said Irma could be more devastating than Hurricane Andrew, a Category 5 storm that struck the state in 1992 and still ranks as one of the costliest ever in the United States.

Residents of the Florida Keys, a resort archipelago at the state’s southern tip, were ordered to leave by Wednesday evening. Residents of low-lying areas in densely populated Miami-Dade County were urged to move to higher ground.

“We can expect additional evacuations as this storm continues to come near our state,” Scott said at a news conference in the Keys.

He said 7,000 National Guard troops would report for duty on Friday, ahead of the storm’s expected arrival.

In South Carolina, Governor Henry McMaster also declared a state of emergency and urged residents to prepare for Irma’s potential landfall there.

“It’s too soon to rule out any possibilities,” said Kim Stenson, director of the South Carolina Emergency Management Division. “Hurricane Irma is a dangerous storm and its projected path could put South Carolina in harm’s way. Fortunately, people in South Carolina have time.”

Reuters contributed to this report

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· Hurricane Irma

Thursday, September 7, 2017

8:44 AM

Who shot and mortally wounded President William B. McKinley on this day in 1901?

Question : Who shot and mortally wounded President William B. McKinley on this day in 1901?

Options:
John Wilkes Booth
Sirhan Sirhan
Leon F. Czolgosz
Jack Leon Ruby

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Answer:

Leon F. Czolgosz

On September 6, 1901, William McKinley, the 25th President of the United States, was shot on the grounds of the Pan-American Exposition at the Temple of Music in Buffalo, New York. McKinley was shaking hands with the public when Leon Czolgosz, an anarchist, shot him twice in the abdomen. McKinley died eight days later of an infection which had spread from that wound. He was the third American president to have been assassinated, following Abraham Lincoln in 1865 and James A. Garfield in 1881. Czolgosz was executed just over seven weeks later.